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Fireplace in well furnished roomIf you have your gas fireplace installed by a team of seasoned professionals, you can be sure that it will operate safely for years to come. That said, every fireplace requires occasional maintenance, and every homeowner should have some degree of responsibility for their fireplace’s safe operation. Here are a few aspects of operation you should keep in mind to ensure that your gas fireplace is safe to use.

Venting

The byproducts of combustion must be safely expelled out of your home via some sort of venting system. The flue must be open at all times during operation. If you have an old gas fireplace, you might consider having a professional fireplace inspector determine whether your current venting system is effective. If not, you may need to have the system reconfigured by professionals.

Ensuring Complete Combustion

Before you switch on your gas fireplace, you’ll need to make sure the pilot light is on. If the pilot light is in intermittent mode, it will ignite as you turn on the fireplace itself. As with other gas appliances in your home, it’s important to ensure that the gas flowing into your fireplace burns completely and that no trace amounts of gas enter your home unburned. Having a carbon monoxide detector in the same room as your fireplace is important for your safety—the same goes for smoke detectors. Again, a fireplace inspector can help ensure that your fireplace is operating as safely as possible.

Avoiding Burns

The glass on a gas fireplace, as well as its surrounding frame, can become hot very quickly. What’s more, the fireplace can remain hot for a long time after the fire goes out. It’s important that you explain to your family the dangers of touching or standing too close to your fireplace. If you have small children, consider installing some sort of protective barrier between the fireplace and the rest of the living space. Consider reaching out to your gas fireplace manufacturer for physical barrier recommendations.

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